Tag Archives: Microsoft

PowerShell and Security – Presentation at iSense

As mentioned in the previous blog post I was invited to speak at iSense to talk about PowerShell and Security. This event was fully by sponsored by iSense who provided the attendees with a great experience. Before my session I was briefly interviewed and the interview, in Dutch, will be available soon.

Security is a topic that continues to make headlines around the world and as a result, PowerShell is mentioned more often either as an method to exploit or to prevent and secure your system. In this presentation I showed how PowerShell can be configured to provide insights in what scripts and tools are running in your environment and how to secure your PowerShell endpoints using Just Enough Administration, JEA.

The audience after 90 minutes of PowerShell and Security

The audience after 90 minutes of PowerShell and Security

After the presentation I received a lot of questions about PowerShell in general and the Dutch PowerShell User Group, we will soon be holding another PowerShell User Group meeting, for more information visit the following link: 10th DuPSUG Meeting, there are at the time of writing still a few tickets available for this event on the 9th of March.

Furthermore, at the Dutch PowerShell User Group we are working on putting out some events that are a bit more beginner oriented. For anyone who is interested in learning more about PowerShell stay tuned as we have a lot of good interesting stuff in the works.

The presentation deck and the slides are as always available on GitHub:
GitHub – Jaap Brasser – Events – iSense2017

For more information I have provided an overview of all the links in this article:

PowerShell and Security @ iSense
GitHub – Slides and code
iSense
Dutch PowerShell User Group
IT Future Lab – PowerShell and Security

Next week: Presenting at iSense on PowerShell and Security

Recently I was invited by iSense to come and speak at one of their technical evenings. On the 16th of February I will be speaking on PowerShell and Security. To quote a short excerpt from the iSense website:

This demo-rich session goes into detail on some best practices on securing PowerShell and highlights and the steps that have been taken in PowerShell 5.0 that allow you to do so. In the first section of this evening we will touch some of the basic concepts of security that we have available to us in PowerShell. Then Jaap will go into detail how you can correctly implement them by demoing the functionality.

For more information on this head over to:
PowerShell and Security – The how, what and why

There are still tickets available, so if you are interested in PowerShell, Security or a combination of both I would be more than happy to meet you there.

PowerShell Conference Asia 2016 wrap-up

Last weekend we wrapped up the PowerShell Conference Asia 2016 in Singapore and it was a great event. I had the opportunity to speak at the event and present a number of sessions. This year we had a healthy mix of PowerShell, DevOps and everything else. The crowd was very engaging, so if you attended the PSConfAsia 2016: “Thank you for being a great crowd!”.

I would like to give a big shout-out to Milton Goh, Matthew Hitchcock, Sebastian Szumigalski, Ravikanth Chaganti and Benjamin Hodge for putting this event together with the support of the sponsors of the event. It was a great opportunity for myself to interact with the PowerShell community in Asia and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Here are some picture to give you an impression of the event:

I presented and/or recording the following sessions for the conference:

Furthermore I was asked to co-host the Arrested Devops Podcast, which was a new and fun experience for me.

For more information here are the links to the PowerShell Conference Asia website, my GitHub repo and to the Twitter hashtag:

PowerShell Conference Asia 2016
Slide decks and code
PowerShell Conference Asia
#PSConfAsia

PowerShell 4.0 Update available for 2012/2008R2/Windows 7

New PowerShell 4.0 updates have been released, part of the Windows Management Framework 4.0 (WMF 4.0). With WMF 5.0 released and then later temporarily retracted from the download center there might be some confusion about who this patch is for, I hope to clear up some of that in this blog post.

So first and foremost, this is a PowerShell 4.0 Update package now also released for Windows Server 2012/2008 R2 SP1 and Windows 7SP1. This upgrade package contains some improvements in regards to DSC and PowerShell logging, please refer to the following two blog articles by the PowerShell team for full details:
Windows Management Framework (WMF) 4.0 Update now available…
Windows Management Framework (WMF) 4.0 Update is coming your way

So more importantly who is this patch intended for, from my perspective this patch is for the following situations:

  • You have WMF 4.0 installed and are in need of the features and fixes offered by this patch
  • Upgrading to PowerShell 5.0 (once it is re-released) is not an option because of incompatibilities which prevent you from upgrading
  • You are in an enterprise environment where roll-outs of completely new versions is limited but patching is possible
  • You are a curious individual and would like to play with the latest, supported, version of PowerShell on your version of Windows

WMF40Update

For more information about what is new in this update, please refer to the following article:
What’s New in Windows PowerShell

The WMF 4.0 updates are currently available as a separate downloads for the following Windows versions:

Operating System Service Pack Prerequisites UPDATE
Windows Server 2012 WMF 4.0 is installed and .NET Framework 4.5 KB3119938
Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 WMF 4.0 is installed and .NET Framework 4.5 KB3109118
Windows 7 SP1 WMF 4.0 is installed and .NET Framework 4.5 KB3109118

For more information these WMF 4.0 Updates and the links in this article please refer to the links below:

Links in this Article
Windows Management Framework (WMF) 4.0 Update now available…
Windows Management Framework (WMF) 4.0 Update is coming your way
What’s New in Windows PowerShell

PowerShell 5.0 RTM available for download

PowerShell 5.0, part of the Windows Management Framework 5.0 (WMF 5.0), is now released and available in the Microsoft Download Center.

WMF5Released

WMF 5.0 is currently available as a separate download for the following Windows versions:

Operating System Service Pack Prerequisites
Windows Server 2012 R2 .NET Framework 4.5 or above
Windows Server 2012 .NET Framework 4.5 or above
Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 WMF 4.0 is installed and .NET Framework 4.5 or above
Windows 8.1
Windows 7 SP1 WMF 4.0 is installed and .NET Framework 4.5 or above

Currently WMF 5.0 RTM can be installed on older Windows clients, Windows 7 and Windows 8.1,  the updates can be downloaded. On Windows 10 WMF 5.0 is not available as an additional download as Windows Update can be used to update the Windows Management Framework.

Before installing WMF 5.0 on your system, please make sure that you read the released notes as there are currently known incompatibilities with the following products:

  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2013
  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 SP3
  • Microsoft SharePoint Server 2013
  • Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010
  • System Center 2012 Virtual Machine Manager

For more information please refer to the Windows Management Framework (WMF) 5.0 RTM Release Notes Overview on MSDN.

For more information on WMF 5.0 and the links in this article please refer to the links below:

Links in this Article
Windows Management Framework 5.0 Download
Windows Management Framework (WMF) 5.0 RTM Release Notes Overview
Known Incompatibilities
PowerShell Team – Windows Management Framework (WMF) 5.0 RTM is now available
Windows Management Framework (WMF) 5.0 currently removed from Download Center

Active Directory Friday: Find groups with no members

Occasionally groups may become obsolete or are never populated with members. It can be interesting to find out how many groups are in your organization that have no members, as action can be taken on it based on the output.

Overview of articles in this series
Active Directory Friday: Find groups with no members
Active Directory Friday: Principal group membership
Active Directory Friday: User account group membership

Because of the nature of how group membership is defined this article will be the first in a series of three. In this article I will show how group membership can be determined using an LDAP queries. The next article in this series will go into principal group membership and its implications and the final article will go into constructed attributes and how to work with constructed attributes, specifically the memberof attribute.

In this article I will give a a number of examples that can be used to determine which groups are empty. Using Get-ADGroup the following command can be executed to retrieve memberless groups:

Get-ADGroup -LDAPFilter '(!(member=*))'

Get-ADGroupNotMemberAnything

Alternatively the DirectoryServices.DirectorySearcher object can be used to achieve a similar result:

(New-Object DirectoryServices.DirectorySearcher -Property @{
 Filter = '(&(objectClass=group)(!(member=*)))'
 PageSize = 100
}).FindAll()

The [adsisearcher] type accelerator is another interesting alternative for this purpose, here is an example:

([adsisearcher]'(&(objectClass=group)(!(member=*)))').FindAll()

The problem with the above examples however, is that some groups will show up as being empty, for example the Domain Users group. Next week I will go into Principal group membership, what this is and how to query for this and by doing so generate more accurate results in regards to group membership.

For more information about the topics discussed in this article, please have a look at the following resources:

Active Directory Friday: Find groups with no members
Get-ADGroup
JaapBrasser.com – Active Directory Friday
Free ebook – Active Directory Friday All Articles
DirectoryServices.DirectorySearcher

PowerShell Conference Asia 2015 Day 2 – The conclusion to a great event

PSConfAsiaSponsors

After the second day the PowerShell Conference Asia in Singapore unfortunately concluded. I have collected a number of photos both from Twitter as well as from my own camera and made them available here for other attendees of the event.

I would like to give a big shout-out to Milton Goh, Matthew Hitchcock, Ravikanth Chaganti and Benjamin Hodge for putting this event together with the support of the sponsors of the event. It was a great opportunity for myself to interact with the PowerShell community in Asia and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

 

For more information here are the links to the PowerShell Conference Asia site and to the Twitter hashtag:

PowerShell Conference Asia 2015 Day 2
PowerShell Conference 2015
#PSConfAsia